Blossom (1)

Animal Corner — Meet the Baby Giraffe!

This is our new baby giraffe, Blossom! Blossom is two months old, and she is already seven feet tall. At birth, she was six feet tall, so she is definitely “blossoming” quickly! When fully grown, she will be around 17 feet and weigh around 2,000 pounds. Blossom joins her fellow giraffe Sheldon right here at Wild Animal Safari. They live in the walkabout, so you can pet and feed both…

Elk (1)

Animal Corner–Elk

Elk are also known as wapiti. This is the Native American word for “light-colored deer.” They can live between eight to twelve years. A group of them is called a gang, and they are herbivores who mostly eat grass, foliage, and wood. Only males grow antlers. Females do not have antlers, like the one pictured above.  While elk and deer are related, they are not exactly the same animals. They…

Camel

Animal Corner — Dromedary Camels

Dromeday camels  have only one hump. They can be found in North Africa and Western Asia. They are much more common than Bactrian camels, those with two humps. Both types are primarily found in hot climates like deserts, although some are located in colder climates. They are herbivores, so their diet mainly consists of grass, seeds, grains, oats, and leaves. Despite what you may have heard, camels do not store…

south-africa-3075762_640

Animal Corner — Zebras

Zebras are more than just “horses with stripes.” These animals are native to Africa, ranging from Kenya and Ethiopia to South Africa and Namibia. There are three types: plains, Grevy’s, and mountain. Of these three, plains zebras are the most common with six subspecies. Their coat helps keep them cool in the hot African heat, dispelling the majority of the sun’s rays. A zebra’s stripes do more than simply make…

grass-3025678_640

Animal Corner–Preparing for Winter at Wild Animal Safari

For several of our animals, the winter season presents many challenges at the park. Some animals come from parts of the world that do not experience cold winter weather.They have not adapted to these cooler temperatures, so it is up to us to help them get through it. Here are a few of the steps we take to protect our animals and keep them warm during these often frigid months:…

beef-2869329_640

Animal Corner — Scottish Highlander

If you’ve driven through our park, then you may have noticed a bull with a thick, shaggy orange coat. He is our Scottish Highlander, which is a breed of cattle from Scotland that lives very close to the Arctic Circle. Their coat is so thick and strong so they can live comfortably in the very cold, sometimes mountainous areas where they live. Because many Scottish Highlanders live on snowy mountains,…

red tailed boa

Animal Corner — Red-Tailed Boa

When a Red-Tailed Boa is first born, it weights between 14 to 22 ounces and can easily fit in your hand — if that’s your thing. Within a year, though, you can say goodbye to holding that snake easily in your hand! At this point, the Red-Tailed Boa is up to eight feet long. Once it is fully grown, this snake can weigh 50 pounds and be 10 feet long. Most…

tiger-2481302_640

Animal Corner — Siberian Tigers

They may not be known as “the king of the jungle,” but Siberian tigers can claim to be the largest cat species in the wild! An adult male can grow to be as much as 700 pounds, with tails up to three feet long. They are also known as Amur tigers, and they can be found throughout Asia in Russia, North Korea and China. Like other members of the tiger…

Buffalo

Animal Corner – The Buffalo

Buffalo used to be very plentiful in American.  Great herds roamed freely across the Great Plains and played a critical role in the lives of indigenous people. Currently, they are few in number but still considered a majestic animal that’s symbolic of the West. Buffalo  can tip the scales at over 2,000 pounds and stand over 6 feet at their shoulders.  They spend most of their time grazing on grasses…

sika-2494974_640

Animal Corner — Sika Deer

Sika deer are commonly known as the “Spotted Deer” and the “Japanese Deer.” They used to live all throughout East Asia, including Vietnam and Russia. Now it is common almost completely in Japan, giving it the nickname the “Japanese Deer.” Unlike most deer, Sika do not lose their spots when they fully mature. Their spot patterns vary depending on the region of Japan they live in. Male Sika antlers grow…